Scientific publications

Niraparib in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Advanced Ovarian Cancer

Antonio González-Martín, M.D., Ph.D., Bhavana Pothuri, M.D., Ignace Vergote, M.D., Ph.D., René DePont Christensen, Ph.D., Whitney Graybill, M.D., Mansoor R. Mirza, M.D., Colleen McCormick, M.D., M.P.H., Domenica Lorusso, M.D., Ph.D., Paul Hoskins, M.D., Gilles Freyer, M.D., Klaus Baumann, M.D., Kris Jardon, M.D., et al., for the PRIMA/ENGOT-OV26/GOG-3012 Investigators*

From Grupo Español de Investigación en Cáncer de Ovario (GEICO) and the Medical Oncology Department, Clínica Universidad de Navarra (A.G.-M.) and GEICO and Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ (A.R.), Madrid, GEICO and Medical Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Girona Biomedical Research Institute, and the Department of Medical Sciences, Medical School University of Girona, Girona (P.B.-G.), and GEICO and Hospital Universitario Reina Sofía, Cordoba (M.J.R.-P.) - all in Spain; the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and the Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Perlmutter Cancer Center, NYU Langone Health (B.P.), and GOG and the Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College (R.E.O.), New York, and US Oncology Research (USOR) and the Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Wilmot Cancer Institute, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester, Rochester (R.G.M.) - all in New York; Belgium and Luxembourg Gynecologic Oncology Group (BGOG) and the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven Cancer Institute, Leuven (I.V.), BGOG and the Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, AZ Maria Middelares, Ghent (C.V.), and the Department of Molecular Imaging, Pathology, Radiotherapy, and Oncology, Center for Oncological Research, Antwerp University, Antwerp (C.V.) - all in Belgium; the Nordic Society of Gynecologic Oncology (NSGO) and the Research Unit of General Practice, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (R.D.C.), NSGO and Rigshospitalet-Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen (M.R.M.), and NSGO and the Department of Oncology, Aalborg University, Aalborg (B.L.) - all in Denmark; GOG and Gynecologic Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston (W.G.); GOG and Legacy Medical Group Gynecologic Oncology, Portland, OR (C.M.); Multicenter Italian Trials in Ovarian Cancer and Gynecologic Malignancies (MITO) and Fondazione IRCCS National Cancer Institute of Milan (D.L.), and MITO and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute (G.M.) - both in Milan; USOR and the Department of Medical Oncology, BC Cancer, Vancouver, BC (P.H.), and GOG and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, McGill University, and the Department of Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Montreal (K.J.) - all in Canada; Groupe d'Investigateurs Nationaux pour l'Etude des Cancers Ovariens and Service d'Oncologie Médicale, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Lyon, France (G.F.); Arbeitsgemeinschaft Gynäkologische Onkologie and the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Klinikum der Stadt Ludwigshafen, Ludwigshafen, Germany (K.B.); the Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus (F.B.); GOG and the Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (A.F.H.), and GOG and Hanjani Institute for Gynecologic Oncology, Asplundh Cancer Pavilion, Abington Jefferson Hospital, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Willow Grove (M.S.S.) - all in Pennsylvania; GOG and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (W.H.B.); Israeli Society of Gynecologic Oncology and Department of Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel (I.B.); GlaxoSmithKline/Tesaro, Waltham, MA (K.S., I.A.M., Y.L., D.G.); and Arizona Oncology (US Oncology Network), University of Arizona College of Medicine, Creighton University School of Medicine, Phoenix (B.J.M.).

Magazine: The New England Journal of Medicine

Date: Sep 28, 2019

Medical Oncology

BACKGROUND

Niraparib, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]–ribose) polymerase (PARP), has been associated with significantly increased progression-free survival among patients with recurrent ovarian cancer after platinum-based chemotherapy, regardless of the presence or absence of BRCA mutations. The efficacy of niraparib in patients with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer after a response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy is unknown.

METHODS

In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer in a 2:1 ratio to receive niraparib or placebo once daily after a response to platinum-based chemotherapy. The primary end point was progression-free survival in patients who had tumors with homologous-recombination deficiency and in those in the overall population, as determined on hierarchical testing. A prespecified interim analysis for overall survival was conducted at the time of the primary analysis of progression-free survival.

RESULTS

Of the 733 patients who underwent randomization, 373 (50.9%) had tumors with homologous-recombination deficiency. Among the patients in this category, the median progression-free survival was significantly longer in the niraparib group than in the placebo group (21.9 months vs. 10.4 months; hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31 to 0.59; P<0.001). In the overall population, the corresponding progression-free survival was 13.8 months and 8.2 months (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.76; P<0.001). At the 24-month interim analysis, the rate of overall survival was 84% in the niraparib group and 77% in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.11). The most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher were anemia (in 31.0% of the patients), thrombocytopenia (in 28.7%), and neutropenia (in 12.8%). No treatment-related deaths occurred.

CONCLUSIONS

Among patients with newly diagnosed advanced ovarian cancer who had a response to platinum-based chemotherapy, those who received niraparib had significantly longer progression-free survival than those who received placebo, regardless of the presence or absence of homologous-recombination deficiency. (Funded by GlaxoSmithKline; PRIMA/ENGOT-OV26/GOG-3012 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02655016. opens in new tab.)

CITATION  N Engl J Med. 2019 Sep 28. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1910962.

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