Publicaciones científicas

Obstructive sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with an increased risk of lung cancer

04-nov-2019 | Revista: Sleep Medicine

Seijo LM (1), Pérez-Warnisher MT (2), Giraldo-Cadavid LF (3), Oliveros H (4), Cabezas E (5), Troncoso MF (6), Gómez T (5), Melchor R (5), Pinillos EJ (5), El Hachem A (5), Gotera C (5), Rodriguez P (5), González-Mangado N (6), Peces-Barba G (6).

(1) Pulmonary Department, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Madrid, Spain; CIBERes, Spain.
(2) Pulmonary Department, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Madrid, Spain.
(3) Universidad de la Sabana, Colombia; Fundación Neumológica Colombiana, Colombia.
(4) Universidad de la Sabana, Colombia; Pontificia Universidad Javierana, Colombia.
(5) Pulmonary Division, IIS, Hospital Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain.
(6) Pulmonary Division, IIS, Hospital Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain; CIBERes, Spain.


STUDY OBJECTIVES: 

To identify a link between sleep disordered breathing, nocturnal hypoxemia, and lung cancer.

METHODS: 

We conducted a cross-sectional study of a combined cohort of 302 individuals derived from the sleep apnea in lung cancer study (SAIL; NCT02764866) investigating the prevalence of sleep apnea in lung cancer, and the sleep apnea in lung cancer screening study (SAILS; NCT02764866) investigating the prevalence of sleep apnea in a lung cancer screening program. All subjects had spirometry and a chest CT, underwent home sleep apnea testing (HSAT), and completed a sleep related questionnaire. Subjects from the SAIL study underwent HSAT prior to initiating oncologic therapy or surgery. Subjects with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 15 were compared with a control group of individuals with an AHI < 15. Propensity score, near neighbor matching, and logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders, were used in order to evaluate the association between sleep apnea, the AHI, oxygen desaturation indices and lung cancer.

RESULTS: 

The prevalence of sleep apnea and lung cancer in the combined cohort was 42% and 21%, respectively. Lung cancer was 8% more prevalent in patients with an AHI >15. The difference was statistically significant when assessed by propensity score matching (p = 0.015) and nearest neighbor matching (p = 0.041). Binary logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders revealed a statistically significant association between AHI (p = 0.04), nocturnal hypoxemia, including time spent below 90% oxyhemoglobin saturation (T90%; p = 0.005), 3% oxygen desaturation index (ODI3; p = 0.02) and lung cancer.

CONCLUSIONS: 

Sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with an increased prevalence of lung cancer.

CITA DEL ARTÍCULO  Sleep Med. 2019 Nov;63:41-45. doi: 10.1016/j.sleep.2019.05.011. Epub 2019 Jun 6