Benign bone tumors

"At the Clínica Universidad de Navarra each patient is attended by a team, which discusses and follows each case in particular, without delays that would condition the efficacy of the treatment".

DR. JOSÉ MARÍA LAMO DE ESPINOSA VÁZQUEZ DE SOLA
SPECIALIST. MUSCULOSKELETAL TUMOURS AREA

Benign bone tumors are anomalous growths of bone cells that, because of their growth, produce the characteristic symptoms.

Within the benign lesions, there is also a particular group called paratumoral lesions, which are not strictly speaking tumors, but which resemble them. An example of these lesions are bone cysts.

In our center, all diagnostic tests (including biopsy) can be performed, usually in less than 24 hours. In addition, we have teams of highly trained professionals in intra-arterial chemotherapy, brachytherapy, isolated limb perfusion, etc.

The Musculoskeletal Tumors Area of the Clinic is one of the most prestigious centers in the world in this field. Its team of professionals is internationally recognized in this field of medicine.

It was one of the first centers in the world to implement programs of conservative surgery of the limb, along with the appropriate adjuvant treatments.

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Types of benign bone tumors

These are bone injuries typical of children, which produce mechanical pain (related to exercise) and sometimes pathological fractures.

These are lytic injuries, in which the bone is replaced by a fluid-filled cavity. If the cortical (the "cortex" of the bone) becomes very weak, it can end up breaking the bone.

They are easily diagnosed by imaging tests (X-ray or MRI). Sometimes they may not require treatment, but most of the time they should be treated to prevent a fracture and allow the child to do his or her normal activity safely. Percutaneous infiltrations of sclerosing substances can be used, or open surgery by curettage and bone grafting.

It is a very small lesion (the size of a lentil) but can be very annoying, preventing nighttime sleep. Most cases are children or adolescents who wake up every day at 3-4 a.m. because of pain.

They need to take anti-inflammatory drugs in order to sleep. The pain is constant (unlike sarcomas, in which it goes "in crescendo"). As it is a very small tumor, sometimes it is not seen on a simple X-ray, and if it is not thought of as a possible cause of night pain, it may not be diagnosed for years.

A CT scan is very useful for diagnosis.

The treatment of most cases can be done percutaneously and without admission, by means of thermoablation under CT control. Usually the pain subsides quickly and the patient is very grateful to be able to go back to sleep, without the need to take anti-inflammatory drugs.

It is a benign proliferation of normal bone tissue covered by normal cartilage tissue, usually detected in childhood. It is like a "mushroom" that comes out to a bone, usually close to the growing cartilage.

Normally it is the parents who detect an abnormal bone prominence in their child. It does not usually hurt.

Sometimes it bothers you with exercise, or compresses a nerve and is unsightly, and the patient or parents want to remove it.

Sometimes, in adulthood, they can malign, and this manifests itself because they grow or hurt. Sometimes it is multiple (osteochondromatosis or exostosing disease, of genetic character), and in these cases the risk of malignization of some of the osteochondromas is greater.

It is a benign proliferation of cartilage within a bone. The most frequent locations are the phalanges, the proximal humerus and the distal femur.

Normally they do not hurt, unless a pathological fracture occurs. If they grow, surgical treatment may be indicated. Curettage, cryosurgery or phenolization and filling are usually performed.

When they are multiple (Ollier's Disease) the risk of malignization of some of the lesions is high and it is convenient to make periodic revisions.

It is a benign disease linked to the GNAS gene, usually by an embryonic mutation during organogenesis.

Depending on the time of the mutation, it affects one bone (monostotic fibrous dysplasia), several bones (polyostotic fibrous dysplasia) or several bones and the skin, with characteristic "café au lait" spots from birth, and sometimes it also affects the endocrine system (the most frequent is precocious puberty, and then it is called Mc Cune-Albright syndrome).

They are areas of the skeleton in which the bone is replaced by fibrous tissue. It can condition severe deformities.

The treatment depends on the severity of the disease: from abstention to complex surgeries to correct the deformities.

Do you have any of these symptoms?

You may have a musculoskeletal tumor

Where do we treat them?

IN NAVARRA AND MADRID

OUR MEDICAL TEAM
Specialists in the Musculoskeletal Tumors Area

The Musculoskeletal Tumors Area of the Clinic is one of the most prestigious centers in the world in this field. Its team of professionals is internationally recognized in this field of medicine.

In our center, all diagnostic tests (including biopsy) can be performed, usually in less than 24 hours. We also have teams of highly trained professionals in intra-arterial chemotherapy, brachytherapy, isolated limb perfusion, etc.

Diseases we treat

  • Osteosarcoma.
  • Ewing's sarcoma.
  • Sarcoma of soft parts.
  • Benign bone tumors.
Imagen de la fachada de consultas de la sede en Pamplona de la Clínica Universidad de Navarra

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