Scientific publications

Continuous dopamine-receptor treatment of Parkinson's disease: scientific rationale and clinical implications

Olanow CW, Obeso JA, Stocchi F.
Department of Neurology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Magazine: Lancet Neurology

Date: Aug 1, 2006

Neurology [SP]

Levodopa-induced motor complications are a common source of disability for patients with Parkinson's disease.

Evidence suggests that motor complications are associated with non-physiological, pulsatile stimulation of dopamine receptors. In healthy brains, dopamine neurons fire continuously, striatal dopamine concentrations are relatively constant, and there is continuous activation of dopamine receptors. In the dopamine-depleted state, standard levodopa therapy does not normalise the basal ganglia. Rather, levodopa or other short-acting dopaminergic drugs induce molecular changes and altered neuronal firing patterns in basal ganglia neurons leading to motor complications.

The concept of continuous dopaminergic stimulation proposes that continuous delivery of a dopaminergic drug will prevent pulsatile stimulation and avoid motor complications. In monkeys treated with MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) and patients with Parkinson's disease, long-acting or continuous infusion of a dopaminergic drug reduces the risk of motor complications.

The current challenge is to develop a long-acting oral formulation of levodopa that provides clinical benefits but avoids motor complications.

CITATION  Lancet Neurol. 2006 Aug;5(8):677-87



The Clínica is the greater private hospital with technological equipment of Spain, all in a single center.

Imagen de un PET, tecnología de vanguardia en la Clínica Universidad de Navarra


The professionals of the Clínica perform continuous research and training, always to the benefit of the patient.

Imagen profesionales de la Clínica Universidad de Navarra


Learn why we are different from other healthcare centers. Quality, speed, comfort and results.

Imagen del edificio de la Clínica Universidad de Navarra